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In fairness - that has Tarantino written all over it.

I'm moving furniture today, so I need something 'big music' to stay motivated and not risk damaging the spine.

This showed up on a Spotify playlist.


This is the dog's undercarriage in fairness. Excellent stuff and very compelling. One of my all time favourite pieces of comic film. Massive fan of Laurel and Hardy and 'New Gold Dream' anyway which is just lush so both together are just excellent:)
 
I've seen Hothouse Flowers a few times down the decades, a band I've always liked, and I love the way they kind of matured over time into something of a nice tapestry of a band and sound. I was delighted to note the intro piece to the new car show on Netflix when the three lads got kicked off the BBC. Jeremy thing.

It was Hothouse Flowers playing and they sounded fantastic.
 
Thinking of Gurdy Leary and the whole 'Nun Attax' scandal in Cork :) I think the whole idea of painting 'Nun Attax' on walls around Cork was fair enough as a publicity drive but it didn't go down well with the local Stasi so Gurdy had to head out of town 'till the heat died down ... swam the Rio Grand between Cork and Kerry with a bass guitar between his teeth, they say... nearly went sane from eating the cactus plants in those parts.
 

valamhic

Member
So is there any good music being created nowadays or am I just stuck in the past with Bob Dylan, the Cranberries, Status Quo and John Farnham.

There were local start ups the Whereabouts and The Strypes. I don't think they cut it , I find them very forceful quantity over quality.

Can someone here post one good song from a modern group/singer.

Here is my idea of a good song, the Irish origin is coincidental. Tell me a modern equivalent.

 

Mowl

Member
This began my day from my radio alarm clock.

Rare tune, haven't heard it in a few decades.

Big Music again from Pete Townsend:


EDIT:
When Townshend was asked about the song he said:


Give Blood was one of the tracks I didn't even play on. I brought in Simon Phillips, Pino Palladino and David Gilmour simply because I wanted to see my three favourite musicians of the time playing on something and, in fact, I didn't have a song for them to work on, and sat down very, very quickly and rifled threw [sic] a box of stuff, said to Dave, "Do one of those kind of ricky-ticky-ricky-ticky things, and I'll shout 'Give Blood!' in the microphone every five minutes and let's see what happens." And that's what happened. Then I constructed the song around what they did.

Big fucking bananas.

This is the dog's undercarriage in fairness. Excellent stuff and very compelling. One of my all time favourite pieces of comic film. Massive fan of Laurel and Hardy and 'New Gold Dream' anyway which is just lush so both together are just excellent:)

I found Kerr a bit tough and chewy, kind of like a steak that's been overcooked. All that prancing about and that very eighties move lots of 'big music' singers did where they lift their knee and take a step forward like a nervous cat? Bono was at it as well, that time when I met him at the rear of the stage at the RDS made me want to slap him repeatedly around the head. He started it, Kerr just copied him, as he did with lots of other shit.

Charlie Burchill and Derek Forbes was Simple Minds. Kerr was just a prop. Getting Mel Gaynor in gave them serious credibility for a short while, but Mel's an industry player, he's been all over more records than the entire line-up of Simple Minds. I'll rotate this tune before ever picking 'Belfast Child', a paean to cash dollar more than a political statement.


Haven't heard Brady in years ... love his style and the piano in his work. Same reason I like Joe Jackson. Bit of a monster, Mr Brady, and I think very influential...

Hah! I still spin A bit of Joe Jackson when mixing a drink and looking forward to spliff before a night out.


I've seen Hothouse Flowers a few times down the decades, a band I've always liked, and I love the way they kind of matured over time into something of a nice tapestry of a band and sound. I was delighted to note the intro piece to the new car show on Netflix when the three lads got kicked off the BBC. Jeremy thing.

It was Hothouse Flowers playing and they sounded fantastic.

Cool, I stay in touch with Dave Clarke, who replaced Jerry Fehily from Cork. Jerry's a diamond little groover, a very original player who started on the drums very late in life. His first love was football, but he took to drums like a duck to PCP. The industry chewed him up though, he had a very hard time with things and had to walk. Also, Liam can be a right cunt when he wants to be. He was dating a Swedish ex of mine and she told me that he always tried the same stunts to save money: walk into the bar singing, 'Don't Go' and expecting free beers. Same in the taxi home. She gave him the shove in the end. Check out Jerry Fehily's drums here.

Dave was originally in Blue In Heaven who became The Blue Angels after getting dropped by Virgin. They spent a fortune, mad amounts of money really on partying and top-end studios and producers. In fact, their demos always outranked the studio albums. I have the entire collection of demos (they aren't online, the band had to relinquish all tunes to the label, and Virgin still make sure even today that they aren't available). It took me a couple of years to source all the copies on MP3 and after compiling them all, I asked Dave if I might post them anonymously, but he warned against it. They're excellent tunes, hot stuff. Getting Quentin Cowper in on guitar was a master stroke - we used him loads of times too.


Ah here you've set me off now. I liked this lot https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Fatima_Mansions


Excellent! As Cathal said: 'only losers take the bus..'

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rNU5HMkPHQQ

Thinking of Gurdy Leary and the whole 'Nun Attax' scandal in Cork :) I think the whole idea of painting 'Nun Attax' on walls around Cork was fair enough as a publicity drive but it didn't go down well with the local Stasi so Gurdy had to head out of town 'till the heat died down ... swam the Rio Grand between Cork and Kerry with a bass guitar between his teeth, they say... nearly went sane from eating the cactus plants in those parts.

Gurdy's another southern genius: he hooked up with Peter O'Kennedy from the Golden Horde and they had several mad bands doing really esoteric shit with a whole array of studio-level gear on the dance floor of Ri Ra. They were called 'Nine Wassies From Bainne' - a three piece band for a time, and they did Thursday nights and we did Friday and Sunday. Gordy's out there in the Captain Beefheart style oasis in a desert, his musical approach is very interesting, he goes at things in the most bizarre of ways, but he always gets results. Was never a fan of the Horde though, Simon Carmody? I wanted to slap him in the neck for his bullshit.

He has some fucking neck, I'll give him that.

Nine Wassies From Bainne.

As mad as mad gets.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0EFa0p0Jkz8
 

Mowl

Member
Can't have a big music section without this yoke. Mike Scott heard local boy Steve Wickham sitting in on a version of U2's 'Bloody Sunday' with his electric violin and got him in to sit on a few tracks from whatever album this was from. Steve played with three different bands in Ballyfermot, all of which were red hot. 'Juggler' did tunes by Stanley Clarke and Return To Forever, they N.ailed them as well. Then there was 'Chess' who did a cross-over of Irish trad and future pop: except the lyrics were all based on Tolkien's books, which was a bit much to get your head around, but they were awesome players too.

The other band was called 'Feathered Wing' and was fronted by local boy Paul Kenny. Very heavily influenced by McCartney and Wings, they had a dirge pop thing going on but their live shows were compelling. Stevie was the common denominator in all three bands. When he got The Waterboys gig he was living around the corner from me in Portobello, and he dropped in regularly for jams in our lounge, which we converted into a studio.

I heard the news when Kevin Wilkinson topped himself: I was gobsmacked, I thought the man had it all, but it just goes to show you: you never know what's going on in most people's heads. Kevin had chronic depression, every time I met him I could see how hard he was trying just to fit in and act normal, but there was an ethereal kind of distracted head-space he seemed to occupy, at the time I put it down to exhaustion. Sadly, no-one knew what was coming down the line and when he went out, he took a lot of people down with him.

The Waterboys were frantically auditioning soon after for a tour that was already booked and mostly sold out. Stevie dropped in to my place in Portobello with the demos from the 'Fisherman's Blues' sessions which was about to be released and left a copy with me to run through, I agreed to come out to the Top Hat in Dun Laoire for three days of messing around with the tracks to get them ready for live shows. The atmosphere was dreadful, really heavy. Anto Thistlethwaite sat offside in the shadows and I couldn't even see him. Trevor Hutchinson was sat on a bar stool staring straight at his amp. Steve was trying to be all upbeat and positive, but his words just hung on the air and stayed there. Mike Scott couldn't keep focus at all and was starting and stopping songs over and over again until they were all silent and staring into the middle distance. It was horrendous, and it broke my heart: I thought I had the gig N.ailed but they were just winging it and waiting for things to make sense again. I didn't come in for the final day, I couldn't, it was too much. I called in sick and left it at that.

The sad part was that word got out that I was in with them and about to head off around the world on tour. I had to tell people they had it all wrong, it was just a jam session, nothing more. In the end they used Fran Breen for the first legs of the tour and then Binzer from The Frames was in there too. Nobody seemed to able to hold the gig down - the band themselves were too fractured to get permanent players in, so they basically used whomever was available for a few weeks at a time then got someone else in.

Still, Kevin was a loss to many people, he had it in spades.

 

Mowl

Member

Check out the drummer, Mowl .... :)

He's a sweetheart with that groove, barely even touching the heads and his tuning is B flat - pure jazz.

Here's one featuring Jerome Rimson with Van; we used Jerome for around two years after Paul Bushnell went over to LA for the 'Commitments' soundtrack.

Jerome's a hot player, but he also has a very short fuse if you toy with him: I was very lucky, he took me under his wing and tried to get me aboard with a number of projects including rhythm section for Seal's return tour, backing band for Bobby Womack's return tour, and a bunch of others. He's seriously well connected.

I loved the story about how he got the gig with Van: he was sitting in with a band who's N.ame escapes me, but there were three N.ames: they were doing some kind of prog rock and were passing through the same airport as Van and his recently fired band. Van told his crew to get him a new band, he hated the one he had. So the guys heard that Such, Such & Such were over in another terminal and their bassist was pissed off with everything. The guys approached Jerome and asked what the deal was, was he available. Jerome gave the nod and the guys went back and said to Van: 'we can get you Jerome Rimson if you ask him now - or you can wait until we get to Denver and get you Leland Sklar for ten days or so....'

Apparently Van, in trademark grumpy mood replied: 'Who? And whom else? Fuck that - gimme the black guy..'


This was how Jerome ended up in Ireland. He lived in Rathmines with the wife and kids until tragedy struck and his apartment went on fire. He lost absolutely everything he owned: all of his bass guitars, amps, other toys, his masters, demos, diaries, records, clothes - everything. That's when we met him: another guy in the same house was an acquaintance of mine and I met Jerome through him. I reported this back to my own crew (we'd just lost Bushnell) and we made him an offer.

He took it too, partly because we also offered him a position in our lucrative side project/jazz quartet - which paid hard cash at the end of the show every Friday and Saturday night in QVII, the joint I was talking to Jennyanydots Jennyanydots about only yesterday. Offside that, we had a publishing deal with Peer Music and they gave us an advance to get six tracks down for consideration. We recorded them in our own studio and used the advance to pay our expenses. That's when I clocked his real genius in arranging music. His production techniques are fairly killer too.

Didn't matter, Peer Music closed down a few months later and the bill was torn up.

He's living down in Cork now, running a studio of his own and coaching junior pop stars and recording new and classic tracks to boost them. We chat now and again: he's a gas man if you're not too intimidated by him; he has a reputation for that short fuse of his. He also loves his cognac, which adds even more fuel to his rage when he's played with or done over. Not a guy I'd like to be on the bad side of. He was Phil Lynott's first choice for the Grand Slam project after Thin Lizzy when Phil was strung out. That ended fairly abruptly when Phil died. Jerome then hooked up with Gus Isidore and went over to London to work with Seal. He was also chosen as band leader for Bobby Womack, there was a tour lined up but Womack took ill and that, as they say, was that.

Phil was looking well here, but this was taken at the beginning of the end for him.

L-R: Phil, Jerome, Gus: Grand Slam - the mega band that never was.
 

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DS86DS

DS86DS

Staff member
Administrator
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Interesting band with a unique style of music. I always liked this in particular, including the music video itself.

 

Thus

Member
They value privacy a lot. When you appear faceless on tv, on stage, etc you avoid the hassle afterwards, they rarely do interviews. But people know what they look like, apparently very shy, introverted types that hate bling bling.

 
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