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Thus

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Macron is expected to announce looser measures this week, I can't remember if it's today or tomorrow. The Covid situation has greatly improved since the last time I posted:

  1. Active cases, this number has dropped considerably but not quick enough since the lock down. End of October we had a high and low of 90k -50k cases a day and were topping Europe. France then "plateaued" at around 40-30k for roughly 8 days, we are now at 15k-9k daily cases
    1. Now under 10k daily, yesterday was at 4,5K
  2. Patients in intensive care in public institutions is the real worry, end of October France was at 60% capacity, France is at 95% now, last week was 96%, there are 4,854 patients in intensive care. France can call on the use of private institutions and military hospitals should they need, which would more than double their intensive care capacity.
    1. Capacity is now 88%, 4,454 patients in ICU
  3. The effective reproduction rate at the end of October was 1.4, this rate corresponds to how many people an infected person was passing the virus onto. This rate is 0.8 (data from the 10th November). Which is positive.
    1. Now is 0,65
  4. The incidence rate is 258 people per 100,000 today, this was end of October 396, so again very positive.
    1. Is now 158
  5. The positivity rate is at 16,2%, this is the percentage of people who get a positive (infected with covid) result. This is down from 22% end of October.
    1. Is now 13,3%

So that means hopefully next week, I'll be able to sit down in a cafe and toast to all you good folk on the Isle.

 
OP
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Thus

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Indeed, the specific details will be given out tonight.
But basically very soon, we'll be able to travel 20km, but a curfew will still exist at night.
Non-essential shops will open, but cafes and bars remain closed.

20 January, I'll be able to go on the sesh again :)
 
OP
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Thus

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An absolutely shocking incident. The followed a black shop keeper home and bate the shite out of him for not wearing a mask, while also yelling racist abuse at him. All that for not wearing a mask.

There's a law being discussed at the minute proposing to make the filming of police illegal. This has kicked off massive protests by Journalists, Newspapers and others, saying that it amounts to censorship.

The street fighting is pretty intense around Bastille / Republique.

 
OP
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Thus

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You can understand why there is now so much anger at the Police, can't you?
 

DS86DS

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One thing I have always loved about France is the sheer diversity of landscapes and architecture within such a relatively medium sized country. You have Paris, which by all means is a city on par with London and New York. You have Celtic Britanny with it's windswept landscape all the way down to the endlessly sunny and beach-rich Mediterranean shore. You have the towering Alps the toweing Pyrenees, the Atlantic coast, the Loire Valley etc

I have always loved visiting France and it would be the first country that I'd consider retiring to, though I'd certainly have to brush up a bit on the language. The myth of the French being rude is also bollocks as well. I'd much prefer the company of a group of French people any day to the English. And unlike the English who look down their noses at the Irish, I have always found that the French have a certain love and affinity for us. It's also an affinity which is respectful and sees us as a noble and ancient land. Many Americans on the other hand have a rather patronising view of the country, even if it is a genuinely held love of the land.

My family own properties in the South of France, so perhaps I could move into one one day when the mortgages are fully paid up on them. Another great thing about France is that given their amazing High speed rail infrastructure, you could nearly be on a sun kissed beach in Marseilles having come from Paris in the same amount of time our lousy trains get from Dublin to Galway.
 
OP
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Thus

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Jean Castex will address the nation tonight to put the breaks on the French "de-confinement".

France's target was to average out at below 5000 cases a day, but the reporting of new cases has been extremely erratic on scale of between 3000-11000 per day.
On saying that % capacity in public hospital ICU's is now down to 58%, beginning of November it was 96%.

It's expected that Theatre's and cinema's will not re-open as planned, a further kick in the nuts for them. While, pubs, cafes and restaurants still will not be able to open for regular business until 20th Jan.
 

DS86DS

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Would it be accurate to say that French politics follows the urban/ rural dynamic found elsewhere, aka. with the cities including Paris and Lyon being more liberal than their counterparts in Brittany or the Vendee, which are perhaps more conservative? Much in the same way as Oklahoma and New Hampshire would be more conservative than say liberal New York or California.

One thing I've always remembered since first studying the French Revolution is that Paris was the most radical regional of the country, with the conservative Vendee supporting the King and the Church. Perhaps it still remains the case.
 
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