Home

NPHET clash with Government

Mowl

Member
If I was to stick to this rubbish I would have to walk because I couldn't get diesel for my van in 2km restrictions

You're pretty much right on the border, yes?

Have you noticed any differences on either side regarding the virus and lock-down restrictions?
 

Coal Gas and peat

Staff member
Moderator
Member
You're pretty much right on the border, yes?

Have you noticed any differences on either side regarding the virus and lock-down restrictions?
Since the heightened restrictions I have not ventured over the border .....I'm usually over there at least twice a week to use their shop..........their shop has to close at 8pm currently where our side is 10pm
I'm a mile from the border and there are several roads I can take to cross .....the guards are not in these roads and neither are the ruc on their side (still afraid of the ira )
All in all novid play acting has increased (pavlovs dog effect) but everyone is breaking the household visit rule ....this tells me it's all for show even the most strident novid play acters are only doing mask and gel in public
 

Mowl

Member
So is the difference regarding the euro and sterling still offering you better prices for your cash?

Unmanned borders have a tendency to see a lot of traffic during the commercial seasons. Are items priced very differently on either side or do they average out the same?
 

Coal Gas and peat

Staff member
Moderator
Member
Milk is an awful lot cheaper in the North mowl, here a monaghan champion milk 2lt is around 2:40 euro......in the North you get 4 litres(two cans) for £2 sterling
The northern shop I rate as a better shop than the centra's spar's down here .....they absolutely stuff the place with everything they can and seem less locked in to the contract with whoever they are with than the shops on our side

Both currencies are eagerly accepted in the northern shops but if you produced a sterling note in a southern border shop they would pull a face :sneaky:

As far as I'm concerned the northern shops are cheaper ...their vat rates are different ....paying in Euro or sterling makes no difference
The only thing cheaper in southern shops now is cigarettes....tobacco....petrol or diesel
 

Mowl

Member
Smokes are cheaper in the Republic than in the north? That's mad. Up here, I'm paying €8.30 for a pack of twenty L&M Silver light cigarettes. They went up back in October by €0.20, which is a sizeable increase in Finnish terms. One and a half liters of pasteurized milk comes in at €0.80. In Finnish stores, there are gluten free products of everything standard in a supermarket: Finns seem to have issues with gluten products: it's a bit like how there are more people wearing glasses in Finland than there are in Ireland. This has to do with the light we get from the sun: it's a very stark white light when the sun is full. Like the angle we're at being so different to the angle of light you get there. Maybe this is also why gluten-free products are so abundant.

When it comes to alcohol, Finns who intend throwing a bash (wedding, anniversary, birthday, etc) will take their car over to Tallin, Estonia to do the major booze shopping there. If you buy from the regular shops rather than the duty free you can stuff the car/van with as much hooch as you like at a quarter of the prices here.

For my evening Bellini's, I use a fairly cheap white wine (€7.50) with regular lonkero (dry green grape juice alcohol, 4.7% - €1.80, 500ml) and karpalo (dry red grape at 4.5% alcohol - €2.35, 500ml) on piles of ice in a long glass. So one bottle of white wine and two cans of lonkero/karpalo comes in at €11.00 and I can mix around five or six long drinks from that. Were I in a bar, the same drink would cost around €8.50+ for one glass. That's if they even make cocktails at all.

My local does Guinness cans at €7.50, 500ml. They also stock Kilkenny at the same price: I never drink there though, I use it for meetings if the upstairs function room is busy for local community issues. I can go down to Kallio and have a pint for as little as €2.50, but it's rank beer, and I stopped drinking beer (outside of sauna) years back. Can't hack the smell of beer at all these days, no idea why. Maybe it's a lifetime of working in bars and lounges performing and other shit. Whatever it is, people drinking beer who I speak to tend to put me right off them. I can't take the smell at all.

There's a six pack of Karjala beer in the fridge I bought before Christmas for guests, but it's still sitting there unopened.

Same with straight white wine: I dislike the acidic bitterness and it dries my mouth and lips.

So it took a few years of trial and error but now I've found my zen in Bellini's.

They're dry, refreshing, slightly sparkling, have a nice after-taste and can be as strong or as weak as you like it. Mid-week, I do lighter versions: on the weekend, I go a bit mad and buy a box of wine, Argentinian white grape (2 litres, 13.5% - €27.50) and twice the number of lonkero/karpalo cans. It covers for guests and lasts from Friday evening through to Sunday night.

You can't buy strong/spirit alcohol on Sunday - the Alko outlets are all closed.

You can buy beer, lonkero, cider, karpalo, and many other choices every day of the week between 10.00am and 2100pm from the local stores.

Alko also closes on bank holidays, observational days, Christmas, and Easter - so you have to plan ahead if you're planning a party or a session.

Sail over to Sweden? The prices in Stockholm are eye-wateringly expensive, insane prices for a beer in the city.

During the summer months, a quick sail over to Tallin for the shopping and then a slow sail back overnight for partying is a lovely experience. The ships are basically mental asylums on water. People get nuts, that's why they're cruising: to party, get laid, dance, sing, make an arse of yourself and go home broke and exhausted.

It costs half nothing and it's worth every dime too.
 
Smokes are cheaper in the Republic than in the north? That's mad. Up here, I'm paying €8.30 for a pack of twenty L&M Silver light cigarettes. They went up back in October by €0.20, which is a sizeable increase in Finnish terms. One and a half liters of pasteurized milk comes in at €0.80. In Finnish stores, there are gluten free products of everything standard in a supermarket: Finns seem to have issues with gluten products: it's a bit like how there are more people wearing glasses in Finland than there are in Ireland. This has to do with the light we get from the sun: it's a very stark white light when the sun is full. Like the angle we're at being so different to the angle of light you get there. Maybe this is also why gluten-free products are so abundant.

When it comes to alcohol, Finns who intend throwing a bash (wedding, anniversary, birthday, etc) will take their car over to Tallin, Estonia to do the major booze shopping there. If you buy from the regular shops rather than the duty free you can stuff the car/van with as much hooch as you like at a quarter of the prices here.

For my evening Bellini's, I use a fairly cheap white wine (€7.50) with regular lonkero (dry green grape juice alcohol, 4.7% - €1.80, 500ml) and karpalo (dry red grape at 4.5% alcohol - €2.35, 500ml) on piles of ice in a long glass. So one bottle of white wine and two cans of lonkero/karpalo comes in at €11.00 and I can mix around five or six long drinks from that. Were I in a bar, the same drink would cost around €8.50+ for one glass. That's if they even make cocktails at all.

My local does Guinness cans at €7.50, 500ml. They also stock Kilkenny at the same price: I never drink there though, I use it for meetings if the upstairs function room is busy for local community issues. I can go down to Kallio and have a pint for as little as €2.50, but it's rank beer, and I stopped drinking beer (outside of sauna) years back. Can't hack the smell of beer at all these days, no idea why. Maybe it's a lifetime of working in bars and lounges performing and other shit. Whatever it is, people drinking beer who I speak to tend to put me right off them. I can't take the smell at all.

There's a six pack of Karjala beer in the fridge I bought before Christmas for guests, but it's still sitting there unopened.

Same with straight white wine: I dislike the acidic bitterness and it dries my mouth and lips.

So it took a few years of trial and error but now I've found my zen in Bellini's.

They're dry, refreshing, slightly sparkling, have a nice after-taste and can be as strong or as weak as you like it. Mid-week, I do lighter versions: on the weekend, I go a bit mad and buy a box of wine, Argentinian white grape (2 litres, 13.5% - €27.50) and twice the number of lonkero/karpalo cans. It covers for guests and lasts from Friday evening through to Sunday night.

You can't buy strong/spirit alcohol on Sunday - the Alko outlets are all closed.

You can buy beer, lonkero, cider, karpalo, and many other choices every day of the week between 10.00am and 2100pm from the local stores.

Alko also closes on bank holidays, observational days, Christmas, and Easter - so you have to plan ahead if you're planning a party or a session.

Sail over to Sweden? The prices in Stockholm are eye-wateringly expensive, insane prices for a beer in the city.

During the summer months, a quick sail over to Tallin for the shopping and then a slow sail back overnight for partying is a lovely experience. The ships are basically mental asylums on water. People get nuts, that's why they're cruising: to party, get laid, dance, sing, make an arse of yourself and go home broke and exhausted.

It costs half nothing and it's worth every dime too.
I believe beer is very expensive in Nordic countries, a mate of my mine who was Iceland a couple of years back said beer was around €11.
But I suppose you ain't going to Iceland for the beer, just as well at those prices. Finland is somewhat cheaper I'd imagine.
 
Smokes are cheaper in the Republic than in the north? That's mad. Up here, I'm paying €8.30 for a pack of twenty L&M Silver light cigarettes. They went up back in October by €0.20, which is a sizeable increase in Finnish terms. One and a half liters of pasteurized milk comes in at €0.80. In Finnish stores, there are gluten free products of everything standard in a supermarket: Finns seem to have issues with gluten products: it's a bit like how there are more people wearing glasses in Finland than there are in Ireland. This has to do with the light we get from the sun: it's a very stark white light when the sun is full. Like the angle we're at being so different to the angle of light you get there. Maybe this is also why gluten-free products are so abundant.

When it comes to alcohol, Finns who intend throwing a bash (wedding, anniversary, birthday, etc) will take their car over to Tallin, Estonia to do the major booze shopping there. If you buy from the regular shops rather than the duty free you can stuff the car/van with as much hooch as you like at a quarter of the prices here.

For my evening Bellini's, I use a fairly cheap white wine (€7.50) with regular lonkero (dry green grape juice alcohol, 4.7% - €1.80, 500ml) and karpalo (dry red grape at 4.5% alcohol - €2.35, 500ml) on piles of ice in a long glass. So one bottle of white wine and two cans of lonkero/karpalo comes in at €11.00 and I can mix around five or six long drinks from that. Were I in a bar, the same drink would cost around €8.50+ for one glass. That's if they even make cocktails at all.

My local does Guinness cans at €7.50, 500ml. They also stock Kilkenny at the same price: I never drink there though, I use it for meetings if the upstairs function room is busy for local community issues. I can go down to Kallio and have a pint for as little as €2.50, but it's rank beer, and I stopped drinking beer (outside of sauna) years back. Can't hack the smell of beer at all these days, no idea why. Maybe it's a lifetime of working in bars and lounges performing and other shit. Whatever it is, people drinking beer who I speak to tend to put me right off them. I can't take the smell at all.

There's a six pack of Karjala beer in the fridge I bought before Christmas for guests, but it's still sitting there unopened.

Same with straight white wine: I dislike the acidic bitterness and it dries my mouth and lips.

So it took a few years of trial and error but now I've found my zen in Bellini's.

They're dry, refreshing, slightly sparkling, have a nice after-taste and can be as strong or as weak as you like it. Mid-week, I do lighter versions: on the weekend, I go a bit mad and buy a box of wine, Argentinian white grape (2 litres, 13.5% - €27.50) and twice the number of lonkero/karpalo cans. It covers for guests and lasts from Friday evening through to Sunday night.

You can't buy strong/spirit alcohol on Sunday - the Alko outlets are all closed.

You can buy beer, lonkero, cider, karpalo, and many other choices every day of the week between 10.00am and 2100pm from the local stores.

Alko also closes on bank holidays, observational days, Christmas, and Easter - so you have to plan ahead if you're planning a party or a session.

Sail over to Sweden? The prices in Stockholm are eye-wateringly expensive, insane prices for a beer in the city.

During the summer months, a quick sail over to Tallin for the shopping and then a slow sail back overnight for partying is a lovely experience. The ships are basically mental asylums on water. People get nuts, that's why they're cruising: to party, get laid, dance, sing, make an arse of yourself and go home broke and exhausted.

It costs half nothing and it's worth every dime too.
I also meant to say Mowl, drink prices in supermarkets here are now mad cheap, I bought a 20 can slab of Guinness in Dunnes for €20 just before Christmas. They also had loads of other great offers.
 

Coal Gas and peat

Staff member
Moderator
Member
Construction sites and manufacturing to be forced to close from tomorrow night....schools closed to God knows when ......even click and collect service at essential retail will not be allowed

:) the hardest of hard lockdown .....the journal.ie and boards.ie will be delighted
 

DS86DS

Staff member
Administrator
Member
I believe beer is very expensive in Nordic countries, a mate of my mine who was Iceland a couple of years back said beer was around €11.
But I suppose you ain't going to Iceland for the beer, just as well at those prices. Finland is somewhat cheaper I'd imagine.

€11 for a pint? Feck that!
 

Mowl

Member
I believe beer is very expensive in Nordic countries, a mate of my mine who was Iceland a couple of years back said beer was around €11.
But I suppose you ain't going to Iceland for the beer, just as well at those prices. Finland is somewhat cheaper I'd imagine.

Finnish prices are far cheaper: a regular Finnish beer costs around €2.50 down in Kallio. It's a 500ml serving in a pint glass, which is kind of annoying in that they hand you a glass three quarters full. But that's how it's done, and it's very cheap in the bohemian area. Go uptown and yes, you might end paying over a tenner for a drink: but those kind of places are much more than bars. They're multi-functional clubs that offer sauna sessions, restaurant with table service, banqueting services, cinema, dancing, romancing, live music, anything you want.

Most cities are the same: if you know where to go, it can be dirt cheap - if you don't, you might well end up paying through the nose.

I also meant to say Mowl, drink prices in supermarkets here are now mad cheap, I bought a 20 can slab of Guinness in Dunnes for €20 just before Christmas. They also had loads of other great offers.

That's pretty much in line with here: a slab of twenty-four 33ml (4.7%) cans from the supermarket comes in at give or take €20.00.

I used to buy them but not any more: my beer days have passed, can't stand the stuff any more.

My pallet is too sensitive to be packing beers down the neck, I'd rather a long cool grape-based drink than a pint.
 

Coal Gas and peat

Staff member
Moderator
Member
Playacting bitch Claire Byrne is going to broadcast tonight propaganda show from outside the mater hospital......despicable behaviour from these RTE ghouls....there is no low these degenerates would not stoop to
 

Coal Gas and peat

Staff member
Moderator
Member
An old medical monitor screen and an oxygen tank have been dragged outside to be used as props..........for this is a propaganda play being paid for by the fools who rolled over to tv licence goon
 
Smokes are cheaper in the Republic than in the north? That's mad. Up here, I'm paying €8.30 for a pack of twenty L&M Silver light cigarettes. They went up back in October by €0.20, which is a sizeable increase in Finnish terms. One and a half liters of pasteurized milk comes in at €0.80. In Finnish stores, there are gluten free products of everything standard in a supermarket: Finns seem to have issues with gluten products: it's a bit like how there are more people wearing glasses in Finland than there are in Ireland. This has to do with the light we get from the sun: it's a very stark white light when the sun is full. Like the angle we're at being so different to the angle of light you get there. Maybe this is also why gluten-free products are so abundant.

When it comes to alcohol, Finns who intend throwing a bash (wedding, anniversary, birthday, etc) will take their car over to Tallin, Estonia to do the major booze shopping there. If you buy from the regular shops rather than the duty free you can stuff the car/van with as much hooch as you like at a quarter of the prices here.

For my evening Bellini's, I use a fairly cheap white wine (€7.50) with regular lonkero (dry green grape juice alcohol, 4.7% - €1.80, 500ml) and karpalo (dry red grape at 4.5% alcohol - €2.35, 500ml) on piles of ice in a long glass. So one bottle of white wine and two cans of lonkero/karpalo comes in at €11.00 and I can mix around five or six long drinks from that. Were I in a bar, the same drink would cost around €8.50+ for one glass. That's if they even make cocktails at all.

My local does Guinness cans at €7.50, 500ml. They also stock Kilkenny at the same price: I never drink there though, I use it for meetings if the upstairs function room is busy for local community issues. I can go down to Kallio and have a pint for as little as €2.50, but it's rank beer, and I stopped drinking beer (outside of sauna) years back. Can't hack the smell of beer at all these days, no idea why. Maybe it's a lifetime of working in bars and lounges performing and other shit. Whatever it is, people drinking beer who I speak to tend to put me right off them. I can't take the smell at all.

There's a six pack of Karjala beer in the fridge I bought before Christmas for guests, but it's still sitting there unopened.

Same with straight white wine: I dislike the acidic bitterness and it dries my mouth and lips.

So it took a few years of trial and error but now I've found my zen in Bellini's.

They're dry, refreshing, slightly sparkling, have a nice after-taste and can be as strong or as weak as you like it. Mid-week, I do lighter versions: on the weekend, I go a bit mad and buy a box of wine, Argentinian white grape (2 litres, 13.5% - €27.50) and twice the number of lonkero/karpalo cans. It covers for guests and lasts from Friday evening through to Sunday night.

You can't buy strong/spirit alcohol on Sunday - the Alko outlets are all closed.

You can buy beer, lonkero, cider, karpalo, and many other choices every day of the week between 10.00am and 2100pm from the local stores.

Alko also closes on bank holidays, observational days, Christmas, and Easter - so you have to plan ahead if you're planning a party or a session.

Sail over to Sweden? The prices in Stockholm are eye-wateringly expensive, insane prices for a beer in the city.

During the summer months, a quick sail over to Tallin for the shopping and then a slow sail back overnight for partying is a lovely experience. The ships are basically mental asylums on water. People get nuts, that's why they're cruising: to party, get laid, dance, sing, make an arse of yourself and go home broke and exhausted.

It costs half nothing and it's worth every dime too.
I've never drank a bellini, I wonder is there an equivalent of those grape juices you use available here, I presume there is.
I'm usually a whiskey man myself, but I'm open to trying something different.
 
Top Bottom