Home

NPHET

valamhic

Member
The asshole eamonn Ryan is saying the travel limit will be put down to 2km
Even Houlihan says the virus is out of control, does anyone believe it can be contained now? What is the object of stopping people exercising? How could they spread the virus? Say Mary, Jack and Paddy are infected. Julie, Tom and Mick are not. How do they know who is who?

Surely they need to house everyone in separate accommodation. Some Dublin flats I lived in long ago have a common bathroom? How do you isolate that?

Surely men and women and women are meeting and having sex? How can you stop that. Are the nurses not coming home from work into homes with children and husbands? If the husband is a shop assistant, is he not bringing it to work and into the canteen.

Am I missing something here? free free to tell me.
 

valamhic

Member
Well, it costs time and money to install it, time and money to train for it, time and money to design a working version of it, so no: you can't bring it in in Ireland.

Paddy's far too thick to set up a clever working system that's both discreet AND super-efficient. No standing around with six bottles under your arm and your neighbour walks past. Your selections arrive in bags, already sealed for your discretion - and that of the children and even the sober alcoholics.

Being both sensible and workable, Paddy would destroy any hopes of ever achieving anything so radical.



Hey, yo! Pizza man? Hey - do you deliver?

Hey - what's a matter with you? Gotta no respect, huh? What do you think you do? Why you looka so sad? Itsa not so bad, itsa nice place.....ah shaddupa you face.

Where would the extra staff come from. Would people stop shopping and stop eating. There is a huge problem for farmers, engineering shops etc getting their lunch. We cant buy our lunch in the local pub. The whole day is spent cooking. 2 hours cooking and eating and an hour driving to the supermarket and buying the food. The virus is a strain of the flu for which the flu vaccine stopped working. How can all this lockdown prevent it spreading?
 
We are hours away from a full N.ational lockdown being announced .....schools closed to Easter at the earliest and essential workers only permitted to work ,travel limit to be reduced to 2 km

Every news and current affairs programme on tv or radio will be full to the throat of covid playacting......it is the only industry now in Ireland

The 4000 plus assholes who tested positive yesterday are the fuel for the fire
How sick are they? not very or not at all would be my guess
They are so weak and pathetic they should be forced to self isolate in their own bathroom for a month ....that would put the novid nothing burger playacting out of them

Bastards:mad:
 

Thus

Member
Even Houlihan says the virus is out of control, does anyone believe it can be contained now? What is the object of stopping people exercising? How could they spread the virus? Say Mary, Jack and Paddy are infected. Julie, Tom and Mick are not. How do they know who is who?

Surely they need to house everyone in separate accommodation. Some Dublin flats I lived in long ago have a common bathroom? How do you isolate that?

Surely men and women and women are meeting and having sex? How can you stop that. Are the nurses not coming home from work into homes with children and husbands? If the husband is a shop assistant, is he not bringing it to work and into the canteen.

Am I missing something here? free free to tell me.

Gyms are closed, I mean it should be obvious why...

Common bathroom...what year was this 1860?

The spread of Covid 19, can be drastically reduced by regular washing (I know that might be an alien concept to you), wearing a mask and the use of alcoholic gel on your hands to clean germs (please don't tell me that you arrive with a shot glass for the gel dispenser when you go into Spar, the gel should not be drank).
 

Mowl

Member
Even Houlihan says the virus is out of control, does anyone believe it can be contained now? What is the object of stopping people exercising? How could they spread the virus? Say Mary, Jack and Paddy are infected. Julie, Tom and Mick are not. How do they know who is who?

Surely they need to house everyone in separate accommodation. Some Dublin flats I lived in long ago have a common bathroom? How do you isolate that?

Surely men and women and women are meeting and having sex? How can you stop that. Are the nurses not coming home from work into homes with children and husbands? If the husband is a shop assistant, is he not bringing it to work and into the canteen.

Am I missing something here? free free to tell me.

Communal bathrooms went out in the late 80's early 90's - it's no longer legal to let a bedsit with a communal toilet/bathroom.

Yes, you are missing something here, thicko - basic cop-on.

Where would the extra staff come from. Would people stop shopping and stop eating. There is a huge problem for farmers, engineering shops etc getting their lunch. We cant buy our lunch in the local pub. The whole day is spent cooking. 2 hours cooking and eating and an hour driving to the supermarket and buying the food. The virus is a strain of the flu for which the flu vaccine stopped working. How can all this lockdown prevent it spreading?

The whole point is that fewer staff are needed to dispense alcohol sales and that they do so in sch a way that doesn't promoter alcohol consumption. Hence the discretion in delivering a paying customer their booze in a sealed bag rather than openly carrying bottles of alcohol in public.

You say it takes you two hours to prepare and eat food?

You lie.

Gyms are closed, I mean it should be obvious why...

Common bathroom...what year was this 1860?

The spread of Covid 19, can be drastically reduced by regular washing (I know that might be an alien concept to you), wearing a mask and the use of alcoholic gel on your hands to clean germs (please don't tell me that you arrive with a shot glass for the gel dispenser when you go into Spar, the gel should not be drank).

Gyms are rife with the virus - lots of sweaty people using the same exercise yokes, all handling the same hand-pieces, all breathing the same air.

Gyms stink - they always have, that's the whole point of them: to work the body extra hard to lose the weight, turn fat to muscle, and sweat out the two litres of water they drink per hour of exercise. I can't help laughing at some of them though: fat middle-aged blokes well past their prime reading newspapers while they cycle on a treadmill. Fat women trying to lift weights.

Buy a fucking bike and cycle to work, dumbass.
 
Sorry- but the virus is still in the driving seat- no matter what. Even the Germans are running out of ICU beds now. Do you seriously expect the HSE being better then the Germans?
We need to be patient. Any celebrations for Christmas will lead to a huge spike in cases- and we are straight into another long lockdown In January/February.
How prophetic!
 
Communal bathrooms went out in the late 80's early 90's - it's no longer legal to let a bedsit with a communal toilet/bathroom.

Yes, you are missing something here, thicko - basic cop-on.



The whole point is that fewer staff are needed to dispense alcohol sales and that they do so in sch a way that doesn't promoter alcohol consumption. Hence the discretion in delivering a paying customer their booze in a sealed bag rather than openly carrying bottles of alcohol in public.

You say it takes you two hours to prepare and eat food?

You lie.



Gyms are rife with the virus - lots of sweaty people using the same exercise yokes, all handling the same hand-pieces, all breathing the same air.

Gyms stink - they always have, that's the whole point of them: to work the body extra hard to lose the weight, turn fat to muscle, and sweat out the two litres of water they drink per hour of exercise. I can't help laughing at some of them though: fat middle-aged blokes well past their prime reading newspapers while they cycle on a treadmill. Fat women trying to lift weights.

Buy a fucking bike and cycle to work, dumbass.
Or as I say, no point fighting the phucking tide!
 

Mowl

Member
If I was to stick to this rubbish I would have to walk because I couldn't get diesel for my van in 2km restrictions

You're pretty much right on the border, yes?

Have you noticed any differences on either side regarding the virus and lock-down restrictions?
 
You're pretty much right on the border, yes?

Have you noticed any differences on either side regarding the virus and lock-down restrictions?
Since the heightened restrictions I have not ventured over the border .....I'm usually over there at least twice a week to use their shop..........their shop has to close at 8pm currently where our side is 10pm
I'm a mile from the border and there are several roads I can take to cross .....the guards are not in these roads and neither are the ruc on their side (still afraid of the ira )
All in all novid play acting has increased (pavlovs dog effect) but everyone is breaking the household visit rule ....this tells me it's all for show even the most strident novid play acters are only doing mask and gel in public
 

Mowl

Member
So is the difference regarding the euro and sterling still offering you better prices for your cash?

Unmanned borders have a tendency to see a lot of traffic during the commercial seasons. Are items priced very differently on either side or do they average out the same?
 
Milk is an awful lot cheaper in the North mowl, here a monaghan champion milk 2lt is around 2:40 euro......in the North you get 4 litres(two cans) for £2 sterling
The northern shop I rate as a better shop than the centra's spar's down here .....they absolutely stuff the place with everything they can and seem less locked in to the contract with whoever they are with than the shops on our side

Both currencies are eagerly accepted in the northern shops but if you produced a sterling note in a southern border shop they would pull a face :sneaky:

As far as I'm concerned the northern shops are cheaper ...their vat rates are different ....paying in Euro or sterling makes no difference
The only thing cheaper in southern shops now is cigarettes....tobacco....petrol or diesel
 

Mowl

Member
Smokes are cheaper in the Republic than in the north? That's mad. Up here, I'm paying €8.30 for a pack of twenty L&M Silver light cigarettes. They went up back in October by €0.20, which is a sizeable increase in Finnish terms. One and a half liters of pasteurized milk comes in at €0.80. In Finnish stores, there are gluten free products of everything standard in a supermarket: Finns seem to have issues with gluten products: it's a bit like how there are more people wearing glasses in Finland than there are in Ireland. This has to do with the light we get from the sun: it's a very stark white light when the sun is full. Like the angle we're at being so different to the angle of light you get there. Maybe this is also why gluten-free products are so abundant.

When it comes to alcohol, Finns who intend throwing a bash (wedding, anniversary, birthday, etc) will take their car over to Tallin, Estonia to do the major booze shopping there. If you buy from the regular shops rather than the duty free you can stuff the car/van with as much hooch as you like at a quarter of the prices here.

For my evening Bellini's, I use a fairly cheap white wine (€7.50) with regular lonkero (dry green grape juice alcohol, 4.7% - €1.80, 500ml) and karpalo (dry red grape at 4.5% alcohol - €2.35, 500ml) on piles of ice in a long glass. So one bottle of white wine and two cans of lonkero/karpalo comes in at €11.00 and I can mix around five or six long drinks from that. Were I in a bar, the same drink would cost around €8.50+ for one glass. That's if they even make cocktails at all.

My local does Guinness cans at €7.50, 500ml. They also stock Kilkenny at the same price: I never drink there though, I use it for meetings if the upstairs function room is busy for local community issues. I can go down to Kallio and have a pint for as little as €2.50, but it's rank beer, and I stopped drinking beer (outside of sauna) years back. Can't hack the smell of beer at all these days, no idea why. Maybe it's a lifetime of working in bars and lounges performing and other shit. Whatever it is, people drinking beer who I speak to tend to put me right off them. I can't take the smell at all.

There's a six pack of Karjala beer in the fridge I bought before Christmas for guests, but it's still sitting there unopened.

Same with straight white wine: I dislike the acidic bitterness and it dries my mouth and lips.

So it took a few years of trial and error but now I've found my zen in Bellini's.

They're dry, refreshing, slightly sparkling, have a nice after-taste and can be as strong or as weak as you like it. Mid-week, I do lighter versions: on the weekend, I go a bit mad and buy a box of wine, Argentinian white grape (2 litres, 13.5% - €27.50) and twice the number of lonkero/karpalo cans. It covers for guests and lasts from Friday evening through to Sunday night.

You can't buy strong/spirit alcohol on Sunday - the Alko outlets are all closed.

You can buy beer, lonkero, cider, karpalo, and many other choices every day of the week between 10.00am and 2100pm from the local stores.

Alko also closes on bank holidays, observational days, Christmas, and Easter - so you have to plan ahead if you're planning a party or a session.

Sail over to Sweden? The prices in Stockholm are eye-wateringly expensive, insane prices for a beer in the city.

During the summer months, a quick sail over to Tallin for the shopping and then a slow sail back overnight for partying is a lovely experience. The ships are basically mental asylums on water. People get nuts, that's why they're cruising: to party, get laid, dance, sing, make an arse of yourself and go home broke and exhausted.

It costs half nothing and it's worth every dime too.
 
Smokes are cheaper in the Republic than in the north? That's mad. Up here, I'm paying €8.30 for a pack of twenty L&M Silver light cigarettes. They went up back in October by €0.20, which is a sizeable increase in Finnish terms. One and a half liters of pasteurized milk comes in at €0.80. In Finnish stores, there are gluten free products of everything standard in a supermarket: Finns seem to have issues with gluten products: it's a bit like how there are more people wearing glasses in Finland than there are in Ireland. This has to do with the light we get from the sun: it's a very stark white light when the sun is full. Like the angle we're at being so different to the angle of light you get there. Maybe this is also why gluten-free products are so abundant.

When it comes to alcohol, Finns who intend throwing a bash (wedding, anniversary, birthday, etc) will take their car over to Tallin, Estonia to do the major booze shopping there. If you buy from the regular shops rather than the duty free you can stuff the car/van with as much hooch as you like at a quarter of the prices here.

For my evening Bellini's, I use a fairly cheap white wine (€7.50) with regular lonkero (dry green grape juice alcohol, 4.7% - €1.80, 500ml) and karpalo (dry red grape at 4.5% alcohol - €2.35, 500ml) on piles of ice in a long glass. So one bottle of white wine and two cans of lonkero/karpalo comes in at €11.00 and I can mix around five or six long drinks from that. Were I in a bar, the same drink would cost around €8.50+ for one glass. That's if they even make cocktails at all.

My local does Guinness cans at €7.50, 500ml. They also stock Kilkenny at the same price: I never drink there though, I use it for meetings if the upstairs function room is busy for local community issues. I can go down to Kallio and have a pint for as little as €2.50, but it's rank beer, and I stopped drinking beer (outside of sauna) years back. Can't hack the smell of beer at all these days, no idea why. Maybe it's a lifetime of working in bars and lounges performing and other shit. Whatever it is, people drinking beer who I speak to tend to put me right off them. I can't take the smell at all.

There's a six pack of Karjala beer in the fridge I bought before Christmas for guests, but it's still sitting there unopened.

Same with straight white wine: I dislike the acidic bitterness and it dries my mouth and lips.

So it took a few years of trial and error but now I've found my zen in Bellini's.

They're dry, refreshing, slightly sparkling, have a nice after-taste and can be as strong or as weak as you like it. Mid-week, I do lighter versions: on the weekend, I go a bit mad and buy a box of wine, Argentinian white grape (2 litres, 13.5% - €27.50) and twice the number of lonkero/karpalo cans. It covers for guests and lasts from Friday evening through to Sunday night.

You can't buy strong/spirit alcohol on Sunday - the Alko outlets are all closed.

You can buy beer, lonkero, cider, karpalo, and many other choices every day of the week between 10.00am and 2100pm from the local stores.

Alko also closes on bank holidays, observational days, Christmas, and Easter - so you have to plan ahead if you're planning a party or a session.

Sail over to Sweden? The prices in Stockholm are eye-wateringly expensive, insane prices for a beer in the city.

During the summer months, a quick sail over to Tallin for the shopping and then a slow sail back overnight for partying is a lovely experience. The ships are basically mental asylums on water. People get nuts, that's why they're cruising: to party, get laid, dance, sing, make an arse of yourself and go home broke and exhausted.

It costs half nothing and it's worth every dime too.
I believe beer is very expensive in Nordic countries, a mate of my mine who was Iceland a couple of years back said beer was around €11.
But I suppose you ain't going to Iceland for the beer, just as well at those prices. Finland is somewhat cheaper I'd imagine.
 
Smokes are cheaper in the Republic than in the north? That's mad. Up here, I'm paying €8.30 for a pack of twenty L&M Silver light cigarettes. They went up back in October by €0.20, which is a sizeable increase in Finnish terms. One and a half liters of pasteurized milk comes in at €0.80. In Finnish stores, there are gluten free products of everything standard in a supermarket: Finns seem to have issues with gluten products: it's a bit like how there are more people wearing glasses in Finland than there are in Ireland. This has to do with the light we get from the sun: it's a very stark white light when the sun is full. Like the angle we're at being so different to the angle of light you get there. Maybe this is also why gluten-free products are so abundant.

When it comes to alcohol, Finns who intend throwing a bash (wedding, anniversary, birthday, etc) will take their car over to Tallin, Estonia to do the major booze shopping there. If you buy from the regular shops rather than the duty free you can stuff the car/van with as much hooch as you like at a quarter of the prices here.

For my evening Bellini's, I use a fairly cheap white wine (€7.50) with regular lonkero (dry green grape juice alcohol, 4.7% - €1.80, 500ml) and karpalo (dry red grape at 4.5% alcohol - €2.35, 500ml) on piles of ice in a long glass. So one bottle of white wine and two cans of lonkero/karpalo comes in at €11.00 and I can mix around five or six long drinks from that. Were I in a bar, the same drink would cost around €8.50+ for one glass. That's if they even make cocktails at all.

My local does Guinness cans at €7.50, 500ml. They also stock Kilkenny at the same price: I never drink there though, I use it for meetings if the upstairs function room is busy for local community issues. I can go down to Kallio and have a pint for as little as €2.50, but it's rank beer, and I stopped drinking beer (outside of sauna) years back. Can't hack the smell of beer at all these days, no idea why. Maybe it's a lifetime of working in bars and lounges performing and other shit. Whatever it is, people drinking beer who I speak to tend to put me right off them. I can't take the smell at all.

There's a six pack of Karjala beer in the fridge I bought before Christmas for guests, but it's still sitting there unopened.

Same with straight white wine: I dislike the acidic bitterness and it dries my mouth and lips.

So it took a few years of trial and error but now I've found my zen in Bellini's.

They're dry, refreshing, slightly sparkling, have a nice after-taste and can be as strong or as weak as you like it. Mid-week, I do lighter versions: on the weekend, I go a bit mad and buy a box of wine, Argentinian white grape (2 litres, 13.5% - €27.50) and twice the number of lonkero/karpalo cans. It covers for guests and lasts from Friday evening through to Sunday night.

You can't buy strong/spirit alcohol on Sunday - the Alko outlets are all closed.

You can buy beer, lonkero, cider, karpalo, and many other choices every day of the week between 10.00am and 2100pm from the local stores.

Alko also closes on bank holidays, observational days, Christmas, and Easter - so you have to plan ahead if you're planning a party or a session.

Sail over to Sweden? The prices in Stockholm are eye-wateringly expensive, insane prices for a beer in the city.

During the summer months, a quick sail over to Tallin for the shopping and then a slow sail back overnight for partying is a lovely experience. The ships are basically mental asylums on water. People get nuts, that's why they're cruising: to party, get laid, dance, sing, make an arse of yourself and go home broke and exhausted.

It costs half nothing and it's worth every dime too.
I also meant to say Mowl, drink prices in supermarkets here are now mad cheap, I bought a 20 can slab of Guinness in Dunnes for €20 just before Christmas. They also had loads of other great offers.
 
Construction sites and manufacturing to be forced to close from tomorrow night....schools closed to God knows when ......even click and collect service at essential retail will not be allowed

:) the hardest of hard lockdown .....the journal.ie and boards.ie will be delighted
 

DS86DS

Staff member
Administrator
Member
I believe beer is very expensive in Nordic countries, a mate of my mine who was Iceland a couple of years back said beer was around €11.
But I suppose you ain't going to Iceland for the beer, just as well at those prices. Finland is somewhat cheaper I'd imagine.

€11 for a pint? Feck that!
 
Top Bottom